Projects

East Anglia Records: ON TOUR

Sunday 18 December, 2016, 4 - 7pm

East Anglia Records on tour begins with a set at CRATE.

Six East Anglia Records in-house label artists will perform their latest compositions on the evening of Sunday 18th December.

eastangliarecords.com

DELUXE FUN LOUNGE: PARADISE 2016

Clarissa Beveridge, Melisa Erol, Ryan Miles & Sophie Taylor

Open Evening: Friday 11 November, 2016. 6–9pm
Open Studio: Saturday 12 - Sunday 13 November. 12-4pm

Deluxe Fun Lounge: Paradise 2016 is opening to the public, presenting both complete and in-progress work.
Taking place at the end of Crate's Graduate Platform Award, the Lounge seeks to develop conversations and discussions concerning each of the graduate’s practices, and is an exciting opportunity for the viewer to participate in their work. The Lounge is a communal space that embraces collaboration, engagement and participation.

For the Open Studio, visitors are invited to engage with the artist’s practices and processes. Having formed a relaxed and informal environment to aid the generation of their work, the artists have considered how the viewer engages with the space. With no blank white walls, the lounge is a working space crammed with tables, sculptures, films, lamps paintings, desks, drawings, rugs, music and chairs.

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist

Machine Room: STRETCHING THE SURFACE

10 - 25 September 2016
Open: Friday - Sunday 12 - 4pm

Machine Room is the research term used in 2006 by artists Mick Finch, Beth Harland, Louisa Minkin and Claude Temin-Vergez. The artists were invited by CRATE to take residence in Margate, and employ the landscapes that they encountered as bases for research. This led to a public display at CRATE, Machine Room: A Blueprint for Painting, and it is this body of research, which is now being responded to for this exhibition. 

This response to that resulting display comes from a group of recent Fine Art graduates, who, for Machine Room: Stretching the Surface, have also considered the dérive, a form of Psychogeography that celebrates the abandonment of intention whilst moving throughout a landscape. 

Clarissa Beveridge, Melissa Erol, Ryan Miles and Sophie Taylor have practices that meet over shared interests in framings, the everyday, material and process, and the viewer’s physical interaction with their work.This exhibition seeks to place the mechanisms and notions of Psychogeography into a contemporary context, placing it within a cultural and technological history of visuality. Utilising their movement throughout Margate and the wider area, the artists have collected pictorial devices embedded in the landscape; look-outs, viewpoints and frameworks.Reading the cultural and architectural ‘eye-catchers’ around the area and building upon their previous experiences and investigations as artists, the four artists are contributing to a broader discussion concerning image seeking and image making.

Clarissa Beveridge defines her practice through attention to material, touch, tone and surface. Seeking to embrace a moment and preserve an action, her work is constantly in process, embracing a visibility of the human hand and forcing the viewer to encounter her decisions in the making.

Melissa Erol employs motifs and gestures that puncture an otherwise colliding combination of ground, colour and form. Working with an archive of objects, images, sketches and collages her work is excited by experience and provoked by the relationship between the frame and the surrounding space.

Ryan Miles explores abandonment and cites this as being key in the beginnings of his work. Responding to the architecture he encounters, works arrive through photography, manipulation and then physical realisation. Using materials such as Perspex and mirrors, there is an allowance for the incorporation of the viewer and the surroundings within the work.

Sophie Taylor responds to everyday visual happenings, approaching an understanding of locations through the patterns and forms that she experiences within them.

Engaging with mundane activities, such as walking or boarding a bus, her work looks to transform these into physical spaces in which the viewer can dwell.
Having employed physical movement to aid the generation of their work, the artists have also considered the way in which we interact with information available to us.
The unending surge of data that we receive, willingly or unwillingly, has formed a new kind of digital landscape throughout which we all pass through.This line of enquiry runs alongisde the original Machine Room research, leading to the development of new works that respond to the physical and the technological world that we inhabit.

Presented as part of the Margate Festival “Sightseeking” 2016

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist
margatefestival.org

Emma Gibson: SHELLING OUT

Preview: October 23, 7 - 9pm
October 24 - November 1, 2015

Part of an ongoing series of environments known as "The Other Room", this new exhibition by Emma Gibson uses a
backdrop of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics to pinpoint a turning of the tide, when things that
were once child's playthings on the beach came to have the price of jewels.

Conchlymania or ‘shell-lunacy’ in the 17th century referred to the hysteria around collecting, acquiring and dealing these ‘works of art from God’. 

Collections became declarations of wealth and faith (the gathering of shells on the beach coffered spiritual status) and the collectors themselves had surprising similarities to dealers and collectors of fine art today- both caring passionately for the status of possessing something strange and unusual from a distant land, preferably before anyone else.

Seashells are naturally occurring and no two shells are ever alike.

Presented inside this parallel universe are two areas, one Production and one Display. Using seashells and their complex and once extremely coveted natural beauty and mythology as a metaphor, it confronts how we consider value and originality today.It is up to you to decide on the origins and meaning of these shells and ultimately, if they have worth.

egibson.co.uk

CRATE Graduate Project Space Award

Photo: Madeline Jones

For three weeks CRATE was occupied by three recently graduated BA Fine Art Students from University of the Creative Arts, Canterbury.

Layla MooreMadeline Jones and Verity Hime were offered the use of our project spaces between the 18th September and the 10th October, to collaborate on the development of work and ideas that emerged during their studies.

Graduates received mentoring sessions with Leigh Clarke, Benedict Drew, Matthew de Pulford and Trish Scott, as well as being supported on-site by Charley Vines and the Programming Team.

There was intermittent public access to the space, including "INTERRUPTION", a projection/collage event on the 3rd October, where participants were invited to bring materials to create immersive and playful outcomes.

The three weeks culminated in a public opening on 10th October, demonstrate the function of the CRATE project spaces, as a site for both work, play and display.

The award is designed as a means for a brief but valuable point between the structures offered within education and independent practice.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for ongoing updates.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Projects