Obscured/Transparent

Sasha Adamczewski, Hannah Mitchell & Christina Symeou

Perview: 27 March, 2015. 6pm-9pm
Exhibition Continues: Friday-Sunday 12pm-5pm, until 12 April

CRATE is delighted to invite three Second Year Fine Art students from the University for the Creative Arts to open an exhibition of recent works.

This exhibition comes as a result of three Second Year Fine Art students having assisted and participated in the recent Jeremy Deller and Fraser Muggeridge exhibition, ‘English Magic Re-Mix’ at Crate.

Obscured/Transparent offers an insight into individual emerging practice, and an exploration between the artists of the crossovers between the themes and concerns that drive their work. Together,  the works investigate the employment of abstraction in the construction of an image or object, whilst presenting a shared examination of structural, natural and material elements.

About the artists:
Sasha Adamczewski, Hannah Mitchell and Christina Symeou have worked together to present new and recent works, developed during their studies at the University for the Creative Arts in Canterbury.

Sasha Adamczewski combines the pictorial, three-dimensional and poetic movement of cinematography to create pieces that incorporate movement, be it filmic, sculptural or performative. Through exposing natural and orchestrated changes of material state, the works offer an insight into processes that are in motion or have previously occurred.

Hannah Mitchell is developing concerns surrounding the dichotomy between urban and natural environments, and the potential conflict of the two co-existing. Using collage as a method to combine materials including paint, paper, varnish and wax, the components and layers present in an image are made visible.

Christina Symeou constructs prints and paintings using organic and abstract shapes derived from her studies of the human form. In dismembering and disorientating impressions of the body, the work exists within the context of painting and image making, and allows for a closer inspection of details that exist as part of a larger assemblage.