Machine Room: STRETCHING THE SURFACE

10 - 25 September 2016
Open: Friday - Sunday 12 - 4pm

Machine Room is the research term used in 2006 by artists Mick Finch, Beth Harland, Louisa Minkin and Claude Temin-Vergez. The artists were invited by CRATE to take residence in Margate, and employ the landscapes that they encountered as bases for research. This led to a public display at CRATE, Machine Room: A Blueprint for Painting, and it is this body of research, which is now being responded to for this exhibition. 

This response to that resulting display comes from a group of recent Fine Art graduates, who, for Machine Room: Stretching the Surface, have also considered the dérive, a form of Psychogeography that celebrates the abandonment of intention whilst moving throughout a landscape. 

Clarissa Beveridge, Melissa Erol, Ryan Miles and Sophie Taylor have practices that meet over shared interests in framings, the everyday, material and process, and the viewer’s physical interaction with their work.This exhibition seeks to place the mechanisms and notions of Psychogeography into a contemporary context, placing it within a cultural and technological history of visuality. Utilising their movement throughout Margate and the wider area, the artists have collected pictorial devices embedded in the landscape; look-outs, viewpoints and frameworks.Reading the cultural and architectural ‘eye-catchers’ around the area and building upon their previous experiences and investigations as artists, the four artists are contributing to a broader discussion concerning image seeking and image making.

Clarissa Beveridge defines her practice through attention to material, touch, tone and surface. Seeking to embrace a moment and preserve an action, her work is constantly in process, embracing a visibility of the human hand and forcing the viewer to encounter her decisions in the making.

Melissa Erol employs motifs and gestures that puncture an otherwise colliding combination of ground, colour and form. Working with an archive of objects, images, sketches and collages her work is excited by experience and provoked by the relationship between the frame and the surrounding space.

Ryan Miles explores abandonment and cites this as being key in the beginnings of his work. Responding to the architecture he encounters, works arrive through photography, manipulation and then physical realisation. Using materials such as Perspex and mirrors, there is an allowance for the incorporation of the viewer and the surroundings within the work.

Sophie Taylor responds to everyday visual happenings, approaching an understanding of locations through the patterns and forms that she experiences within them.

Engaging with mundane activities, such as walking or boarding a bus, her work looks to transform these into physical spaces in which the viewer can dwell.
Having employed physical movement to aid the generation of their work, the artists have also considered the way in which we interact with information available to us.
The unending surge of data that we receive, willingly or unwillingly, has formed a new kind of digital landscape throughout which we all pass through.This line of enquiry runs alongisde the original Machine Room research, leading to the development of new works that respond to the physical and the technological world that we inhabit.

Presented as part of the Margate Festival “Sightseeking” 2016

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist
margatefestival.org